HIV Breakthrough: Scientists Discover New HIV Antibody

Researchers have reportedly achieved a breakthrough by discovering an HIV antibody capable of suppressing the virus for nearly six months without additional treatment.

Researchers have reportedly achieved a breakthrough by discovering an HIV antibody capable of suppressing the virus for nearly six months without additional treatment.

The study was carried out on a group of monkeys who were infused with a neutralising antibody combined with an immune stimulatory compound.

The discoveries which were released at the 25th Conference on Retroviruses and opportunistic infections in Boston was a boost to previous researched and discoveries that have been done in the past.

“HIV excels at evading the immune system by hiding out in certain immune cells,” said NIAID Director Anthony Fauci.

“The virus can be suppressed to very low levels with antiretroviral therapy, but quickly rebounds to high levels if a person stops taking medications as prescribed.”

“The findings from this early stage research offer further evidence that achieving sustained viral remission without daily medication might be possible,” the report read.

Experts added six of eleven monkeys that were given the therapy combinations displayed a viral rebound after a median of 112 days, and five others of the 11 did not rebound for at least 168 days.

“Our findings suggest that the development of interventions to activate and eliminate a fraction of the viral reservoir might be possible,” said Dan Barouch, principal investigator of the study.